Where is Shingapore?

Singapore is a city-state in Southeast Asia. Founded as a British trading colony in 1819, since independence it has become one of the world's most prosperous countries and boasts the world's busiest port. Combining the skyscrapers and subways of a modern, affluent city with a medley of Chinese, Malay and Indian influences and a tropical climate, with tasty food, good shopping and a vibrant night-life scene, this Garden City makes a great stopover or springboard into the region. Singapore is a small island country. With a population size of over 5.5 million people it is a very crowded city, second only to Monaco as the world's most densely populated country. However, unlike many other densely populated countries, Singapore - with more than 50% of its area covered by greenery and with over 50 major parks and 4 nature reserves - is an enchanting garden city.




The weather in Singapore

°F (°C) JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC
MAX 86.2
(30.1)
88.0
(31.1)
88.9
(31.6)
89.1
(31.7)
88.9
(31.6)
88.3
(31.3)
87.6
(30.9)
87.6
(30.9)
87.6
(30.9)
88.0
(31.1)
87.1
(30.6)
85.8
(29.9)
MIN 73.9
(23.3)
74.5
(23.6)
75.0
(23.9)
75.9
(24.4)

76.6
(24.8)

76.5
(24.7)
76.1
(24.5)
75.9
(24.4)
75.6
(24.2)
75.2
(24.0)
74.7
(23.7)
74.1
(23.4)

Singapore has a tropical rainforest climate with no distinctive seasons, uniform temperature and pressure, high humidity, and abundant rainfall. Temperatures usually range from 23 to 32 °C (73 to 90 °F). Relative humidity averages around 79% in the morning and 73% in the afternoon. April and May are the hottest months, with the wetter monsoon season from November to January from July to October, there is often haze caused by bush fires in neighboring Indonesia. Although Singapore does not observe daylight saving time, it follows time zone GMT+8, one hour ahead of its geographical location.

Currency

The Singapore dollar (sign: S$; code: SGD) is the official currency of Singapore. It is divided into 100 cents. It is normally abbreviated with the dollar sign $, or S$ to distinguish it from other dollar-denominated currencies. The Monetary Authority of Singapore issues the banknotes and coins of the Singapore dollar. As of 2016, the Singapore dollar is the twelfth-most traded currency in the world by value. Apart from its use in Singapore, the Singapore dollar is also accepted as customary tender in Brunei according to the Currency Interchangeability Agreement between the Monetary Authority of Singapore and the Autoriti Monetari Brunei Darussalam (Monetary Authority of Brunei Darussalam).

SIGHTS INFORMATION

Merlion Park

Merlion Park (Raffles Place MRT exit H, off Fullerton Rd). Singapore's official symbol, 8.6 meters tall and weighing 70 tons, spouts water daily on the south bank of the mouth of the Singapore river. (The statue previously resided further down the river, but was moved in 2002 after the opening of the Esplanade Bridge.) Designed by the Singapore Tourist Promotion Board in 1964, many a commentator has pondered on the inherent contradictions of a creature that is half-lion, half-fish. Any time of night or day, a steady stream of tourists troops up to see the mythical beast, and a purpose-built pier lets you take pictures with the Merlion and the CBD in the background. When paying your respects, don't miss the bite-sized Mini-Merlion (officially the "Merlion cub"), a mere two meters tall, just 28m away towards the bridge. Free.

Marina Bay

Marina Bay is Singapore's newest district, created on reclaimed land just south of Riverside. The label "Marina Bay" is a little fuzzy. Technically, it's the body of water created by reclaiming land around the mouth of the Singapore River and blocked off from the sea by the Marina Barrage, but Singaporeans associate the name "Marina" with the Marina Square shopping mall and the many hotel developments around it on the north shore of the river. The half to the south of the river, or Marina South, has to date been just empty land dotted with construction sites, but its centerpiece, the Marina Bay Sands casino and convention center, opened in April 2010 and there's lots more to come. In this article, Marina Bay is simply defined as everything to the east of Shenton Way and Esplanade Drive. Transport to Marina Bay is organized. The northern half (Esplanade & Promenade) is best accessed through the Circle MRT Line and the southern half is best accessed through the Downtown MRT Line (Bayfront & Downtown).

Gardens By The Bay

Gardens by the Bay is a nature park spanning 101 hectares (250 acres) of reclaimed land in central Singapore, adjacent to the Marina Reservoir. The park consists of three waterfront gardens: Bay South Garden, Bay East Garden and Bay Central Garden. The largest of the gardens is Bay South Garden at 54 hectares (130 acres). Gardens by the Bay is part of a strategy by the Singapore government to transform Singapore from a "Garden City" to a "City in a Garden". The stated aim is to raise the quality of life by enhancing greenery and flora in the city.

Sentosa Island

Sentosa is a popular island resort in Singapore, visited by some twenty million people a year. Attractions include a 2 km (1.2 mi) long sheltered beach, Fort Siloso, two golf courses, the Merlion, 14 hotels, and the Resorts World Sentosa, featuring the theme park Universal Studios Singapore. The name Sentosa translates as "peace and tranquility" in Malay, which was in turn derived from the Sanskrit term Santosha , meaning "contentment, satisfaction". Sentosa was formerly known as Pulau Blakang Mati which in Malay means the "Island of Death from Behind".

Casino in Singapore(Marina Bay Sands Entertainment)

Opened in 2010 Singapore Marina Bay Sands is part of the mega $5.5 billion resort project, Marina Bay Sands Hotel. But it’s much more than just a hotel and casino; in fact it has everything to become Southeast Asia’s next top entertainment destination. Place your bet, and hope you’re lucky. Only less than a month after its opening, a few Lotus Evora cars from the casino’s ‘Mystery Car Jackpot’ had found new owners. Not bad at all for those who played on the 5¢, 10¢, 20¢ or multi-denomination machines and won. And more are coming, don’t worry. Lost the lucky streak? Then head up to the Sands Skypark for jaw-dropping city panoramas and a fun-filled night at the many rooftop clubs (check out the uber-chic KU DÉ TA). Even if you’re out of luck, you’ll never run out of entertainment.

Universal Studio Singapore (Sentosa Island)

Southeast Asia’s first and only Universal Studios theme park, featuring 24 rides, shows and attractions in seven themed zones. Universal Studios Singapore is a theme park located within Resorts World Sentosa on Sentosa Island, Singapore. It features 24 rides, shows and attractions in seven themed zones. It was a key component of Genting's bid for the right to build Singapore's second integrated resort. On 8 December 2006, the Singapore government announced that the consortium had won the bid.

Harbor Front

HarbourFront, is a waterfront district situated in southern Singapore. Whilst HarbourFront's boundaries are ambiguous, its location is roughly represented on the URA's Master Plan as a subzone called Maritime Square, located within the Bukit Merah Planning Area. Main thoroughfares in HarbourFront include Keppel Way and Telok Blangah Road. Notable buildings in the vicinity include HarbourFront Centre, Singapore Cruise Centre, St James Power Station and VivoCity. Maritime Square is currently being redeveloped into a new business and lifestyle hub.

Orchard Street

Orchard Road is named after the nutmeg orchards that used to line it in the 1830s, one of them coincidentally belonging to a Mr Orchard Road. Large trees still shade the road, providing a modicum of relief from the heat. Fortunately, Orchard Road has an extensive network of underpasses that connect many of the malls providing even more shelter from the blistering equatorial heat and, on occasion, rain.

China Town

Chinatown in Singapore is a sharp contrast to the rest of the city, with low rise buildings and culture bursting out onto the streets, from the fragrant smells of traditional cuisine to the bold red and gold tones that run through the neighborhood. This is an area that’s proud of its heritage, and has it very much on display. There are ornate Chinese, Buddhist and Hindu temples, museums galore and plenty of opportunities to soak up the bustling streets lined with old shophouses. Here’s our list of the best things to see in Chinatown Singapore.

Buddha Tooth Relic Temple

288 South Bridge Rd, 9 AM-6:30 PM. The Buddha Tooth Relic Temple and Museum (BTRTM) was founded in 2002 by Venerable Shi Fazhao. It was registered by the Registrar of Societies in 20th February 2003, and as a charity under the Charities Act in 8th January 2004. The Temple is dedicated to the Maitreya Buddha, which means 'The Compassionate One', and also called 'The Future Buddha'.
Having been so urged by Ven. Cakkapala, Ven. Shi Fazhao found himself being tested. To get things started, he resolved to be secluded in a one-year Dharma Lotus Blossom Retreat. Thanks to blessings from the Triple Gems, Ven. Shi Fazhao conceived during the retreat not only the name "Buddha Relic Tooth Temple (Singapore)", but also an architectural style based on the Buddhist mandala and integrated with the art culture of Buddhism in the Tang dynasty. Naturally, the classical ethos of the building has to be matched with a site with a long history.

Kwan Im Thong Hood Cho

178 Waterloo St. Dedicated to Kuan Yin, the Goddess of Mercy. According to legend, wishes made in here come true, which would explain why it's always packed. The procedure goes like this: enter, light some joss sticks, pray for advice about a dilema, then shake a container of cham si(bamboo sticks) until one falls out. Throw a pair of red Jiao. If you get one on the round side and the other on the flat side, get a free matching slip with verses (also in English) explaining the Goddess's advice. Advice is not always given. If it is given, take it to one of the resident soothsayers for their interpretation. Free, although voluntary donations are accepted.

Thian Hock Keng Temple

The oldest Hokkien temple in Singapore, dating back to 1821, although the structure was thoroughly refurbished in 2000. The brightly colored, elaborate facade was constructed with ironwork from Scotland, tiles from England and the Netherlands, and dragon-ornamented granite pillars from China. Free. Chinatown is at its busiest and most colorful in the month preceding the Chinese New Year (Jan-Feb), when the streets are decked with festive decorations. Street markets are thronged with people, shows entertain the crowds and the drums of lion dances echo into the night. The festivities in a midnight countdown and a roar of firecrackers atop People's Park Complex, showering flaming confetti down below (steer clear!) — and for the two following days virtually everything is closed.

Little India

Little India is, as the name promises, the center for the large Indian community in Singapore. While a rather sanitized version of the real thing, Little India retains its distinct identity without degenerating into a mere tourist attraction and is one of the most colorful and attractive places to visit in Singapore. Little India's main drag is Serangoon Road, which starts at Rochor Canal Rd and continues northward to Serangoon itself, where it ends at Punggol. The action is tightly concentrated a few blocks on either side of the road, and can be easily covered on foot.

Sri Mariamman Temple

The Sri Mariamman Temple is Singapore's oldest Hindu temple. It is an agamic temple, built in the Dravidian style. Located at 244 South Bridge Road, in the downtown Chinatown district, the temple serves the majority Hindu Singaporeans, Tamilians, in the city-state. Due to its architectural and historical significance, the temple has been gazetted a National Monument and is a major tourist attraction. Sri Mariamman Temple is managed by the Hindu Endowments Board, a statutory board under the Ministry of Community Development, Youth and Sports.

Arab Street

Arab Street was the name of a road and neighbourhood in Singapore. There are two explanations behind the name. The first one is that the area was owned by an Arab merchant, Syed Ali bin Mohamed Al Junied and that it was the site of an Arab kampong, hence the name Arab Street. The Chinese referred the street as jiau a koi Javanese, in the view of the Javanese who used to be the majority inhabitants of the area. Spices, textiles, basketry items and songkoks are sold along this row of shophouses with five-foot way at Arab Street. In Tamil, Arab Street is known as pukadai sadkku (flower shops street), because of shops selling homegrown flowers, lime and other goods sold by Javanese women. In 1889, a huge fire occurred.

Masjid Sultan

Masjid Sultan or Sultan Mosque, is a mosque located at Muscat Street and North Bridge Road within the Kampong Glam precinct of the district of Rochor in Singapore. The mosque is considered one of the most important mosques in Singapore. The prayer hall and domes highlight the mosque's star features. Sultan Mosque has stayed essentially unchanged since it was built, with only repairs carried out to the main hall in the 1960s and an annex added in 1993. It was gazetted as a national monument on 8 March 1975. Today the mosque is managed by its own Board of Trustees and Management Board.

Clarke Quay

Clarke Quay was named after Sir Andrew Clarke, Singapore's second Governor and Governor of the Straits Settlements from 1873 to 1875, who played a key role in positioning Singapore as the main port for the Malay states of Perak, Selangor and Sungei Ujong. Clarke Quay is also the name of a road along the quay, part of which has since been converted into a pedestrian mall. Clarke Street, located next to Clarke Quay, was officially named in 1896, and was originally two streets known simply as East Street and West Street in north Kampong Malacca. Similar to Clarke Quay, Clarke Street has since been converted into a pedestrian mall.

River Cruise (Cleake Quay)

The Singapore River Cruise is one of the things most tourists enjoy doing that is truly unforgettable. The cruise however, is nothing without the bumboats, which are used for carrying passengers on their tour along the riverbanks. The bumboats were once used as a means of transporting goods and cargo back in the early days of Singapore history.
Originating from the 1600s in Europe, these boats are very different from the earlier versions which had sails, were powered by oars or guided by long poles to move them up and down the rivers. As run-down as they may sound, don't look down on these bumboats. They were vital in driving trade activities on the Singapore River for over a hundred and fifty years as they carried cargo from one destination to the next.

Singapore Flyer

The Singapore Flyer is a giant Ferris wheel in Singapore. Described by its operators as an observation wheel, it opened in 2008, construction having taken about 2½ years. It carried its first paying passengers on 11 February, opened to the public on 1 March, and was officially opened on 15 April. It has 28 air-conditioned capsules, each able to accommodate 28 passengers, and incorporates a three-storey terminal building. The Flyer has an overall height of 165 metres (541 ft) and was the world's tallest Ferris wheel until the 167.6 m (550 ft) High Roller, which is 2.6 m (9 ft) taller than the Flyer, opened on the Las Vegas Strip in Nevada, US, on 31 March 2014.[8] The previous record holder, the Star of Nanchang, in Jiangxi, China, is 160 m (525 ft) tall, although its 153 m (502 ft) diameter wheel is larger than the Flyer's 150 m (492 ft) wheel.

Singapore Zoo

The Singapore Zoo, formerly known as the Singapore Zoological Gardens and commonly known locally as the Mandai Zoo, occupies 28 hectares (69 acres) on the margins of Upper Seletar Reservoir within Singapore's heavily forested central catchment area. There are about 315 species of animal in the zoo, of which some 16 percent are considered to be threatened species. From the beginning, Singapore Zoo followed the modern trend of displaying animals in naturalistic, 'open' exhibits with hidden barriers, moats, and glass between the animals and visitors. It houses the largest captive colony of orangutans in the world.

Junrong Bird Park

Jurong Bird Park is an aviary and tourist attraction in Jurong, Singapore. The bird park, managed by Wildlife Reserves Singapore, covers an area of 0.2 square kilometres (49 acres) on the western slope of Jurong Hill, the highest point in the Jurong region. It was reported by Wildlife Reserves Singapore on 1 June 2016 that Jurong Bird Park will cease operations and be relocated to 80 Mandai Lake Road, 729826 in year 2020 with a new name for the Bird Park. As for now, operation continues as per normal.

Night Safari

The Night Safari is the world's first nocturnal zoo and is one of the most popular tourist attractions in Singapore. The concept of a nocturnal park in Singapore was suggested in the 1980s by the former executive chairman of the Singapore Zoo, Dr Ong Swee Law. Constructed at a cost of S$63 million, the Night Safari was officially opened on 26 May 1994 and occupies 35 hectares (86 acres) of secondary rainforest adjacent to the Singapore Zoo and Upper Seletar Reservoir. The Night Safari currently houses over 2,500 animals representing over 130 species, of which 38% are threatened species.

Raffles Hotel

Raffles Hotel is a colonial-style luxury hotel in Singapore. It was established by Armenian hoteliers, the Sarkies Brothers, in 1887. The hotel was named after British statesman Sir Thomas Stamford Raffles, the founder of Singapore. It is the flagship property of Raffles Hotels & Resorts, a subsidiary of Fairmont Raffles Hotels International. Raffles Hotel has a shopping arcade with 40 specialty boutiques. The arcade also houses most of the hotel's restaurants.

Changi Museum

The Changi Museum is a museum dedicated to Singapore's history during the Second World War and the Japanese occupation of Singapore in particular. The museum has a collection of paintings, photographs and personal effects donated by former POWs. Among the collection is a series of paintings and sketches by a POW named William Haxworth which provide valuable insight on the daily life of the internees during the occupation. In 1986, Haxworth's wife donated a collection of over 400 paintings and sketches to the National Archives of Singapore. The museum is also famous for its replica of the Changi Murals, a set of five murals made by the POW Stanley Warren.

National Museum of Singapore

The National Museum of Singapore is the oldest museum in Singapore. Its history date back to 1849, when it was started as a section of a library at Singapore Institution and called the Raffles Library and Museum. After several relocations, it moved to its permanent site at Stamford Road in the Museum Planning Area in 1887. The museum focuses on exhibits related to the history of Singapore. It is one of four national museums in the country, the other three being the two Asian Civilisations Museums at Empress Place Building and Old Tao Nan School, and the Singapore Art Museum. It was named the National Museum of Singapore in 1965; between 1993 and March 2006, it was known as the Singapore History Museum.

Bintang Island(Singapore Neighborhood)

Bintan Island or Negeri Segantang Lada is an island in the Riau Archipelago of Indonesia. It is part of the Riau Islands province, the capital of which, Tanjung Pinang, lies in the island's south and is the island's main community. Singapore, the closest major city, is a 45-50 minute trip by motorized catamaran across the Singapore Strait from Bintan Resort area in the northwest of the island. The island has beaches with beach-front hotels and resorts; the most prominent of these beaches is the Bintan Resorts set over an area of 300 hectares (740 acres) of tropical environment. The archipelago of the Riau islands is right opposite to this resort across the South China Sea. Indonesia is promoting Bintan as the next best tourist destination after Bali.

Johor Bahru(Malaysia, Neighborhood of Singapore)

Johor Bahru is the capital of the state of Johor, Malaysia. It is also the southernmost city in Peninsular Malaysia. Johor Bahru has a population of 497,097, while its metropolitan area, with a population of 1,638,219, is the third largest in the country. Johor Bahru was founded in 1855 as Iskandar Puteri when the Sultanate of Johor came under the influence of Temenggong Daeng Ibrahim. The area was renamed "Johor Bahru" in 1862 and became the capital of the Sultanate when the Sultanate administration centre was moved there from Telok Blangah.

Fomura 1 (Entertainment)

The Singapore Grand Prix is a motor race which forms part of the FIA Formula One World Championship. The event takes place on the Marina Bay Street Circuit and was the inaugural night race and the first street circuit in Asia for F1 races. Spaniard Fernando Alonso won the first Formula One edition of the Grand Prix, driving for the Renault team amid controversial circumstances, when it emerged a year later that his teammate Nelson Piquet Jr. had been ordered to crash on purpose by senior team management to bring out the safety car at a time chosen to benefit Alonso. The Singapore Grand Prix will remain on the F1 calendar until at least 2021, after race organizers signed a contract extension with Formula One Management on the first day of the 2017 event. The previous contract extension was signed in 2012 and lasted until 2017. Since 2008, every race edition has featured at least one safety car, a total of 17 safety car deployments, as of 2017.

What to eat in Vietnam

Chili Crab (Singapore Food)

The Singapore Grand Prix is a motor race which forms part of the FIA Formula One World Championship. The event takes place on the Marina Bay Street Circuit and was the inaugural night race and first street circuit in Asia for F1 races. Spaniard Fernando Alonso won the first Formula One edition of the Grand Prix, driving for the Renault team amid controversial circumstances, when it emerged a year later that his teammate Nelson Piquet Jr. had been ordered to crash on purpose by senior team management to bring out the safety car at a time chosen to benefit Alonso. The Singapore Grand Prix will remain on the F1 calendar until at least 2021, after race organizers signed a contract extension with Formula One Management on the first day of the 2017 event. The previous contract extension was signed in 2012 and lasted until 2017. Since 2008, every race edition has featured at least one safety car, a total of 17 safety car deployments, as of 2017.


Laksa (Singapore Food)

Laksa, in particular the Katong laksa or laksa lemak style, is probably the best-known Singaporean dish: white noodles in a creamy, immensely rich coconut-based curry broth, topped with cockles or shrimp. Be warned that the common style found in hawker centers is very spicy, although you can ask for less/no chilli to dial down the heat. The Katong style is much less spicy and is generally found only in Katong itself. Singapore laksa is very different from Penang laksa, which is a spicy, sourish, clear soup made with a tamarind-infused broth.


Hawker Centres

The cheapest and most popular places to eat in Singapore are hawker centres, essentially former pushcart vendors directed into giant complexes by government fiat. Prices are low ($2-5 for most dishes), hygiene standards are high (every stall is required to prominently display a health certificate grading it from A to D) and the food can be excellent — if you see a queue, join it! The lack of air-conditioning may seem somewhat unbearable to foreigners, but a visit to a hawker centre remains a must when in Singapore. However, be leery of overzealous pushers-cum-salesmen, especially at the Satay Club in Lau Pa Sat and Newton Food Centre at Newton Circus: the tastiest stalls don't need high-pressure tactics to find customers. Touting for business is illegal, and occasionally a reminder of this can result in people backing off a bit.