Where is Bali?


Currency

Indonesian Rupiah(IDR) is the currency in Indonesia.
IDR1=100sen
NOTES: IDR50,000, 20,000, 10,000, 5000, 1000, 500 and 100
COINS: IDR1000, 500, 100, 50 and 25
Credit Cards: Larger establishments in Jakarta and Bali accept major credit cards. You will need cash for all transactions in most other areas of the country. Cash can be withdrawn from larger banks and ATMs in Jakarta with Visa, MasterCard, American Express.

What’s the weather like in Bali?

May, June and July are generally considered to be the best time to travel to Bali in terms of the weather. However, depending on whether the traveler is a surfer or explorer, preferences may change. During the dry season, May to October, the western side of the peninsula creates some of the world's best waves. The best advice is to check the estimated weather during time of travel and pack accordingly.

°F (°C) JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC
High °F 86 84 84 88 88 88 88 90 90 90 88 88
High °C 33 33 34 33 33 32 32 32 33 34 34 34
Low °F 86 84 84 88 88 88 88 90 90 90 88 88
Low °C 25 25 25 25 26 25 25 24 25 25 26 25

SIGHTS INFORMATION

Kuta

The tourist capital of the island, and arguably of the whole of Indonesia, Kuta often gets a bad press with independent travelers looking for the "real Bali". This, though, doesn't detract from the fact that it is home to one of the best beaches on the island - a beautiful swathe of white sand - and is a great place for surfers who aren't up to braving the perils of Uluwatu, earning it the nickname "surfers' paradise".
Admittedly the barrage of hawkers trying to sell fake Rolexes and the like can get irritating, but it's really a matter of what you're looking for in a holiday and if you're simply after a nice beach with a good choice of restaurants, bars and shops, you've found your place. You will also be pleasantly surprised by the town that reveals itself once you get off the main drag and onto some of the quiet, typically Balinese back streets, just waiting to be explored.

Jimbaran and Seminyak

If you don't want to travel too far from Kuta, but are looking for some respite from the crowds and hawkers, Jimbaran and Seminyak offer very different alternatives. North of Kuta, the small, laid back town of Seminyak has become a popular stopping place for a variety of international expats. As a result, it has become a center for upmarket restaurants, including French, Italian, Greek, Thai and Japanese, and is becoming renowned as the top place for clubbing on the island. In complete contrast, the sleepy fishing village of Jimbaran, just south of the airport, offers beautiful, calm beaches and simple restaurants where you can eat fresh fish on the beach, grilled beneath the starry night sky.

Ubud

The artistic center of Bali, charming Ubud is home to numerous art galleries and craft shops, making it an ideal place for art lovers to browse while soaking up the very Balinese atmosphere. Wander through the back streets to the strains of gamelan music playing in the distance and feel you being transported into another world. Some of the best traditional dance shows can be seen here or you can simply watch the locals making their tiny Hindu offerings to throw into the street to ward off danger.
Just out of the town, stroll down to the aptly named Monkey Forest, to see some of its inhabitants swinging from the trees - some of them have been known to stray out of the forest, surprising people staying at nearby hotels.

Nusa Dua

Nusa Dua is an area in the southern part of Bali, Indonesia, known as an enclave of large 5-star resorts. It is located 22 kilometers from Denpasar, the provincial capital of Bali, and administered under South Kuta District. Nusa Dua means two islands (nusa 'island', dua 'two'), because there are 2 islands in the bay of Bali Tourism Development Corporation area. On the southern side lies Peninsula Island, and on the northern side lies Nusa Dharma Island, which is smaller but shadier, and which contains the Pura/Temple Nusa Dharma.

Sanur

Sanur (Indonesian:Pantai Sanur, pronounced sah-noor) is a coastal stretch of beach of Denpasar city of southeast Bali, about 30 minutes drive from Ngurah Rai International Airport, which has grown into a little town in its own right. A 5.1 kilometers area of Sanur's coastline, from Matahari Terbit Beach to Mertasari Beach, was reclaimed in 2008.
Today Sanur contains a number of hotel resorts such as the Fairmont Sanur Beach Bali and Bali Hyatt (currently under renovation and not to be confused with the Grand Hyatt in Nusa Dua). Sanur is also home to a growing number of popular villa resorts, such as The Zen Villas.

Denpasar

Crowded and bustling, Bali's capital is often avoided by visitors who are eager to get straight to the beach. Yet Denpasar has several attractions of interest, and is well worth exploring. One of the main highlights is the majestic Hindu Temple of Jagat Natha, Denpasar's main Hindu place of worship and the center of festivals and local events. Just a couple of kilometers out of the city center are the traditional buildings set in landscaped gardens of the Bali Arts Centre or Taman Budaya, offering some of the best of Balinese culture with regular displays of dance and theatrical productions as well as art exhibitions. The town also offers some colorful markets, selling practically anything from birds and reptiles to food and fabrics, as well as dozens of excellent Chinese and Indonesian restaurants.

Legian

Legian is a suburban and beach area on the west coast of Bali just north of Kuta and south of Seminyak the area between Jl. Melasti and Jl. Dhyana Pura. Administratively it is a subdistrict of Kuta District of Badung Regency.
Legian is mentioned in "I've Been To Bali Too", the single by Australian folk-rock band Redgum from their 1984 album Frontline.

Tanah Lot Temple

Tanah Lot means "Land [in the] Sea" in the Balinese language. Located in Tabanan, about 20 kilometers (12 mi) from Denpasar, the temple sits on a large offshore rock which has been shaped continuously over the years by the ocean tide.
Tanah Lot is claimed to be the work of the 16th-century Dang Hyang Nirartha. During his travels along the south coast he saw the rock-island's beautiful setting and rested there. Some fishermen saw him, and bought him gifts. Nirartha then spent the night on the little island. Later he spoke to the fishermen and told them to build a shrine on the rock, for he felt it to be a holy place to worship the Balinese sea gods. The main deity of the temple is Dewa Baruna or Bhatara Segara, who is the sea god or sea power and these days, Nirartha is also worshipped here.

Goa Gajah

Gua Gajah (Elephant Cave) which is located in west side of Bedulu countryside, Blah Batuh Sub district and Gianyar Regency. It is about 27 km from Denpasar town. This cave is built at crevasse edge from the federation of 2 rills that is called Pangkung River, where the irrigation is mixed with Petanu River flow. The federation area of two rivers is called Campuhan/Mixture. It owns the magical energy on the basis of Rwabineda Concept/two different matters on this basic concept hence Gua Gajah (Elephant Cave) is intentionally built among two rivers.

Pura Uluwatu

Uluwatu Temple (Pura Uluwatu) is one of Bali's nine key directional temples. Though a small temple was claimed to have existed beforehand, the structure was significantly expanded by a Javanese sage, Empu Kuturan in the 11th Century. Another sage from East Java, Dang Hyang Nirartha is credited for constructing the padmasana shrines and is claimed to have attained Moksha here. Even more remarkable than the temple itself is its location, perched on a steep cliff 70 meters above the roaring Indian ocean waves. There are more steep headlands on either side and sunsets over Uluwatu are a sight to behold. You need to be properly dressed to enter. Sarongs and sashes are available free at the entrance. Guides, once famously mercenary, hassle visitors less than they used to, although they will offer to "protect" you from the monkeys, for a tip of course. Note that while you are free to walk around the temple grounds, the central courtyards can only be entered during special rituals.

Pura Besakih

Pura Besakih is a temple complex in the village of Besakih on the slopes of Mount Agung in eastern Bali, Indonesia. It is the most important, the largest and holiest temple of Hindu religion in Bali, and one of a series of Balinese temples. Perched nearly 1000 meters up the side of Gunung Agung, it is an extensive complex of 23 separate but related temples with the largest and most important being Pura Penataran Agung. The temple is built on six levels, terraced up the slope. The entrance is marked by a candi bentar (split gateway), and beyond it the Kori Agung is the gateway to the second courtyard.

Mt Batur

Mount Batur (Gunung Batur) is an active volcano located at the center of two concentric calderas north west of Mount Agung on the island of Bali, Indonesia. The south-east side of the larger 10×13 km caldera contains a caldera lake. The inner 7.5-kilometer-wide caldera, which was formed during emplacement of the Bali (or Ubud) ignimbrite, has been dated at about 23,670 and 28,500 years ago.
The first documented eruption was in 1804 and the most recent was in 2000.
The caldera is populated and includes the four main villages of Kedisan, Songan, Trunyan and Toya Bungkah, among a total of 15 villages. The locals largely rely on agriculture for income but tourism has become increasingly popular due to the relatively straightforward trek to the summit of the central crater.

Gunung Agung

More of a long-haul excursion, but if you have the time, you won't regret visiting Lombok. Often described as the Bali of 20 years ago, Lombok is quieter and less commercialized than its more famous western neighbor, though tourism has taken a firm hold over the last few years and you certainly won't be entering uncharted territory (or having to slum it, for that matter). Lombok is actually quite different to Bali. Firstly, the predominant religion here is Islam, rather than Hinduism, meaning there's quite a different cultural outlook. Also, although the two islands share volcanic terrain, Lombok has a drier climate and thus lacks the lush rice paddies that are so evocative of the Balinese landscape. Like Bali, though, Lombok has beautiful beaches, a laid back, friendly locals and stunning natural scenery. Away from the beaches, the more adventurous visitors to Lombok head off to Gunung Rinjani, the island's highest mountain and an active volcano, a great place for trekking or just taking in the breathtaking scenery. It's not really worth going to Lombok for less than a couple of days, as the ferry from Padangbai (in Bali) takes four hours, though there are regular Merpati flights from Bali which will whisk you there in no time. Note that there have been recent civil disturbances in Lombok and you should contact your Foreign Office or Indonesian Embassy before travelling to get the latest information on the situation.

Lombok Island (Bali Neighbor)

More of a long-haul excursion, but if you have the time, you won't regret visiting Lombok. Often described as the Bali of 20 years ago, Lombok is quieter and less commercialized than its more famous western neighbor, though tourism has taken a firm hold over the last few years and you certainly won't be entering uncharted territory (or having to slum it, for that matter). Lombok is actually quite different to Bali. Firstly, the predominant religion here is Islam, rather than Hinduism, meaning there's quite a different cultural outlook. Also, although the two islands share volcanic terrain, Lombok has a drier climate and thus lacks the lush rice paddies that are so evocative of the Balinese landscape. Like Bali, though, Lombok has beautiful beaches, a laid back, friendly locals and stunning natural scenery. Away from the beaches, the more adventurous visitors to Lombok head off to Gunung Rinjani, the island's highest mountain and an active volcano, a great place for trekking or just taking in the breathtaking scenery. It's not really worth going to Lombok for less than a couple of days, as the ferry from Padangbai (in Bali) takes four hours, though there are regular Merpati flights from Bali which will whisk you there in no time. Note that there have been recent civil disturbances in Lombok and you should contact your Foreign Office or Indonesian Embassy before travelling to get the latest information on the situation.

Borobudur (Bali Neighbor)

Borobudur is a 9th-century Mahayana Buddhist temple in Magelang, Central Java, Indonesia, as well as the world's largest Buddhist temple, and also one of the greatest Buddhist monuments in the world. The temple consists of nine stacked platforms, six square and three circular, topped by a central dome. The temple is decorated with 2,672 relief panels and 504 Buddha statues. The central dome is surrounded by 72 Buddha statues, each seated inside a perforated stupa. Built in the 9th century during the reign of the Sailendra Dynasty, the temple was designed in Javanese Buddhist architecture, which blends the Indonesian indigenous cult of ancestor worship and the Buddhist concept of attaining Nirvana. The temple also demonstrates the influences of Gupta art that reflects India's influence on the region, yet there are enough indigenous scenes and elements incorporated to make Borobudur uniquely Indonesian. The journey for pilgrims begins at the base of the monument and follows a path around the monument and ascends to the top through three levels symbolic of Buddhist cosmology: Kāmadhātu (the world of desire), Rupadhatu (the world of forms) and Arupadhatu (the world of formlessness).

Komodo Island

Komodo is one of the 17,508 islands that compose the Republic of Indonesia. The island is particularly notable as the habitat of the Komodo dragon, the largest lizard on Earth, which is named after the island. Komodo Island has a surface area of 390 square kilometres and a human population of over two thousand. The people of the island are descendants of former convicts who were exiled to the island and who have mixed with Bugis from Sulawesi. The people are primarily adherents of Islam but there are also Christian and Hindu congregations. Komodo is part of the Lesser Sunda chain of islands and forms part of the Komodo National Park. In addition, the island is a popular destination for diving. Administratively, it is part of the East Nusa Tenggara province.

Wayang Kulit (Bali’s Traditional Culture)

Wayang, also known as Wajang, is a form of puppet theatre art found in Indonesia and other parts of Southeast Asia, wherein a dramatic story is told through shadows thrown by puppets and sometimes combined with human characters. The art form celebrates the Indonesian culture and artistic talent, its origins are traced to medieval era spread of Hinduism and the arrival of leather-based puppet arts called Tholu bommalata from southern India.
Performances of shadow puppet theatre are accompanied by a gamelan orchestra in Java, and by gender wayang in Bali. The dramatic stories play out mythologies, such as episodes from the Hindu epics the Ramayana, the Mahabharata as well as local adapations of cultural legends.

Batik (Indonesia’s Traditional Cloth)

Batik is a technique of wax-resist dyeing applied to whole cloth, or cloth made using this technique. Batik is made either by drawing dots and lines of the resist with a spouted tool called a canting, or by printing the resist with a copper stamp called a cap. The applied wax resists dyes and therefore allows the artisan to colour selectively by soaking the cloth in one colour, removing the wax with boiling water, and repeating if multiple colours are desired.
A tradition of making batik is found in various countries, including Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, India, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, the Philippines and Nigeria; the batik of Indonesia, however, may be the best-known.

What to eat in Saipan

Nasi Goreng

Nasi goreng, literally meaning "fried rice" in Indonesian and Malay, can refer simply to fried pre-cooked rice, a meal including stir fried rice in a small amount of cooking oil or margarine, typically spiced with kecap manis (sweet soy sauce), shallot, garlic, ground shrimp paste, tamarind and chilli and accompanied by other ingredients, particularly egg, chicken and prawns. There is also another kind of nasi goreng which is made with ikan asin (salted dried fish) which is also popular across Indonesia.


Mie Goreng

Mie goreng, also known as bakmi goreng, is a flavorful and spicy fried noodle dish common in Indonesia, Malaysia, Brunei Darussalam and Singapore. It is made with thin yellow noodles fried in cooking oil with garlic, onion or shallots, fried prawn, chicken, beef, or sliced bakso (meatballs), chili, Chinese cabbage, cabbages, tomatoes, egg, and other vegetables. Ubiquitous in Indonesia, it can be found everywhere in the country, sold by all food vendors from street-hawkers, warungs, to high-end restaurants. It is an Indonesian one-dish meal favorite, although street food hawkers commonly sell it together with nasi goreng (fried rice).


Nasi Champur

Nasi campur refers to a dish of a scoop of nasi putih (white rice) accompanied by small portions of a number of other dishes, which includes meats, vegetables, peanuts, eggs and fried-shrimp krupuk. Depending where it originates, a nasi campur vendor might served several side dishes, including vegetables, fish and meats. It is a staple meal of the Southeast Asian countries, and popular especially in Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, Brunei, and southern Thailand, and also the Netherlands through its colonial ties with Indonesia. A similar form called chanpurū exists in Okinawa.


Sate(Ayam/Daging)

Satay, or sate in Indonesian and Malaysian spelling, is a dish of seasoned, skewered and grilled meat, served with a sauce. Satay may consist of diced or sliced chicken, goat, mutton, beef, pork, fish, other meats, or tofu; the more authentic version uses skewers from the midrib of the coconut palm frond, although bamboo skewers are often used. These are grilled or barbecued over a wood or charcoal fire, then served with various spicy seasonings. Satay can be served in various sauces, however most often they are served in a combination of soy and peanut sauce. Hence, peanut sauce is often called satay sauce.


Ikan Bakar

Ikan bakar is an Indonesian or Malaysian dish of charcoal-grilled fish or other forms of seafood. Ikan bakar literally means "burned fish" in Malay and Indonesian. The barbecued fish is one of the classic Indonesian dish.
As an archipelagic nation, ikan bakar is very popular in Indonesia, commonly found in many places; from an Acehnese beach right down, a restaurant perched over Kupang's harbor in East Nusa Tenggara, to the center of Jakarta's business district. Various specific version exist, including as Sundanese ikan bakar Cianjur, which mainly grilled freshwater fish, such as carp and gourami, and Balinese ikan bakar Jimbaran, freshly grilled seafood fish in warungs clustered near Jimbaran beach and fishmarket in Bali. The barbecued seafood however, is especially popular in eastern Indonesia region; Sulawesi and Maluku where most of the people work as fishermen, and both areas have a vast sea which brings them different kind of seafood. Usually, the fish is marinated with mixture of spices pastes, and sometimes with belacan or kecap manis (sweet soy sauce) and then grilled; sometimes protected with a sheet of banana leaf placed between the seafood and grill to avoid the fish being stuck to the grill and broken to pieces.


Soto Ayam

Soto ayam is a yellow spicy chicken soup with lontong or nasi himpit or ketupat (all compressed rice that is then cut into small cakes) and/or vermicelli[4] or noodles, commonly found in Indonesia, Singapore, Malaysia and Suriname. Turmeric is added as one of its ingredients to get yellow chicken broth. It is probably the most popular variant of soto, a traditional soup commonly found in Indonesian cuisine. Besides chicken and vermicelli, it can also be served with hard-boiled eggs, slices of fried potatoes, Chinese celery leaves, and fried shallots. Coconut milk is sometimes used as an ingredient. Occasionally, people will add "koya", a powder of mixed prawn crackers with fried garlic or orange colored spicy sambal, krupuk or emping is a very common topping.


Bakso

Bakso or baso is Indonesian meatball, or meat paste made from beef surimi. Its texture is similar to the Chinese beef ball, fish ball, or pork ball. The term bakso could refer to a single meatball or the whole bowl of meatballs soup. The term mie bakso refer to bakso served with yellow noodles, while the term bakso kuah refer to bakso meatballs soup served without any noodles. Bakso can be found all across Indonesia; from the traveling cart street vendors to restaurants. Next to soto, satay and siomay, bakso is a popular street food in Indonesia. Today, various types of ready to cook bakso also available as frozen food commonly sold in supermarkets in Indonesia.